Wednesday, October 22, 2014

"The Death of Bees"- Destroys and Restores Your Emotions

Courtesy of Goodreads.com
"Today is Christmas Eve.
Today is my birthday.
Today I am fifteen.
Today I buried my parents in the backyard.
Neither of them were beloved."


Right off the bat, you know that The Death of Bees (2012) is going to be rough.  This is a book about horribly neglectful and abusive parents; the pitfalls of the government's policies on child welfare; misplaced and malicious judgement made about people; growing up in general; and the tenacity that children and teenagers have to survive their situations no matter how dire.  The book is gritty and in your face; the author does not shy away from the violence and neglect that pervades homes and families.  Author Lisa O'Donnell's debut novel, The Death of Bees does not hesitate to shock; it is the shock factor of the novel that jolts the reader to the realization that this story is one that could very well happen. O'Donnell uses short, abrupt descriptions to create the stark surroundings that the girls live in.  The realism is further conveyed through the dialogue between the characters.  It is real, emotional, secretive at times, and also full of slang that normal teenagers and children would use.  O'Donnell has a distinctive style that keeps the story moving along quickly, but also embeds the story into the reader's mind and soul.

In layman's terms, Marnie and her younger sister, Nelly's, lives are terrible.  Their parents are violent drug addicts, who have little time for their children.  Marnie reflects throughout the novel about her having to care for Nelly since Nelly was a baby. Nelly, who appears to have autism and is very brilliant and mature for her young age, is burdened by the fact that they are keeping a huge secret. The critical plot point for the novel is not revealed at once.  Rather, the situation is slowly and painfully revealed to the reader through the interactions between the characters and flash-backs.  When they find that both their parents are dead, they have no choice but to keep it a secret. However, the secrecy of the two leads to suspicions from their neighbor, Lennie, a homosexual man who is ostracized in the neighborhood due to a scandal; Lennie's dog seems intent on digging in the girls' backyard and Lennie does not quite buy the whole 'our parents are just on vacation' story.



Lisa O'Donnell, courtesy of usatoday.com
O'Donnell does not pull any punches with The Death of Bees. To the outside world, they seem like two deadbeat girls.  However, O'Donnell paints an enlightening family portrait of them; they are two smart girls who are living under the shadow of their parent's drug use, even after death. They are determined to stay together out of love and camaraderie. The realism portrayed in the parents' drug use, and the far reaching consequences of it, is startling.  We see how one of the main villains of the story is the government and it bureaucracy.  O'Donnell makes a poignant, yet firm point about the results of trying to tear apart siblings who have nothing but each other.  Time and time again, the Child Protection services from the government flit in and out of their lives, not really doing anything, not really helping the girls like they should. We see how the girls' fear of being separated by the government drives their actions, making the government possibly the most despicable character in the book. Their fear only drives them closer, which in turn cements their relationship; they are tough sisters who will stick together no matter what. O'Donnell really explores the topic of how government action, especially after the fact of neglect and abuse, is more destructive to the girls' lives than if they would have been just left alone. That is quite possibly O'Donnell's main point: one is left to their own devices when everyone else around them fails to help.  

Yet, there is an underlying note of hope throughout the whole novel.  Rays of light and hope permeate through the grime of the main characters' lives, making the novel suspenseful in it's own right.  The one person who cares enough to try to help is the neighborhood pariah.  Lennie's homosexuality poses problems throughout the book.  He is cruelly discriminated against; however, he is the only adult in the novel who wants to selflessly help the girls and he demonstrates the greatest amount of kindness and understanding.  Lennie is a beautiful character, perhaps the best written of the entire novel.  A juxtaposition to the despised drug addict and alcohol class in the area, Lennie is shunned because of his homosexuality.  This isolation puts him in an awkward position, one where he has to chose self-preservation or chose the girls that have become his eccentric family.  O'Donnell weaves the story in a way to where the reader does not really know who is actually the main character, if it's the girls that need redemption and love so badly or if it's the man who needs the same.  The outcome is sublimely dramatic; the reader is thrown off course and then treated to a whirlwind that leaves them breathless and hopeful.  


This is a beautiful book about different lives coming together. Lennie, Marnie, and Nelly are all in the same boat; they are preemptively judged by those around them and tossed aside, labeled as no-goods.  The pain and suffering that they endure, however, leads to hope.  O'Donnell uses the horror of their lives, the sadness, the loneliness, to illustrate that their is always hope, even in the most unexpected places. It is a beautiful piece of fiction.  This novel never quite tears you down; you keep rooting for Marnie and Nelly, despite their setbacks.  You begin to think in their terms and realize that nothing should tear you down completely.  It is a story about survival, acceptance, and love.  It is not elegant or academic.  Yet, it examines the human condition and what we do to survive in such a way, it makes you question your own ability to withstand life's challenges.  

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