Monday, January 31, 2011

American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month. The American Heart Association focuses on women this month with their "Go Red for Women" campaign. A few facts about women and heart disease: 
  • Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women age 20 and over, killing approximately one woman every minute.
  • More women die of heart disease than the next four causes of death combined, including all forms of cancer.
  • 1 in 3 American women die of heart disease, compared to 1 in 30 women that die of breast cancer.
  • Ninety percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease.
  • Eighty percent of cardiac events in women may be prevented if they make the right choices for their hearts, involving diet, exercise and abstinence from smoking.*
For information about heart disease, prevention, and treatment, visit the 616.1, 616.12, and 616.123 call numbers @ your library branch.

From the library website,(www.calcasieulibrary.org/resources) you can access through the LA state online resources the following databases that will cover not only heart health, but overall health:
Consumer Health Complete,
Teen Health and Wellness,
and health and medicine resources found in the Gale Virtual Reference Library.

On the web, visit http://www.heart.org/, http://www.goredforwomen.org/, or http://www.medlineplus.gov/.


*Facts and logo provided by www.goredforwomen.org

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Moss Bluff Book Chat: January 18, 2011

Book Chat is a weekly meeting at the Moss Bluff Library that allows people to get together and discuss what they are currently reading, as well as get ideas on what to read next.

We have also begun a “Book of the Month,” which will be handed out for all members to discuss on a specific date. Our first book is The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards, which will be discussed on February 1st. Copies are still available for those wishing to participate.

Below are a couple books readers discussed at the January 18th meeting.

Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons

Kaye Gibbons’ debut novel from 1987 Ellen Foster follows the titular character Ellen, 11, as she searches for a good family and home following the suicide of her mother. Despite a series of adverse events, Ellen remains determined at all times until she gets what she wants. Ellen Foster is a coming-of-age tale that makes for a quick and heart-warming read.

Find it at your library!

Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver, author of The Poisonwood Bible, ties together the stories of three different characters in southern Appalachia in Prodigal Summer. The novel focuses on each character’s connection to nature and how important such a connection is. Kingsolver has both a talent for vivid, almost tangible, descriptions of settings and a versatility in writing that allows each character a distinct voice. Her strengths intertwine to make Prodigal Summer an absorbing book.

Find it at your library!

(Images from: http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780375703058; http://www.harpercollins.com/books/Prodigal-Summer-Barbara-Kingsolver?isbn=9780060959036&HCHP=TB_Prodigal+Summer)

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Librarian's Pick: Ladies of the Field

Ladies of the Field: Early Women Archaeologists and their Search for Adventure

Author: Adams, Amanda
ISBN: 9781553654339
Call Number: 930.1092 ADA 2010

Summary: The seven adventurous ladies - Gertrude Bell, Harriet Boyd-Hawes, Agatha Christie, Jane Dieulafoy, Amelia Edwards, Dorothy Garrod, and Zelia Nuttall - highlighted in this book were pioneering archaeologists. Their life stories make the Victorian era's “men only in archaeology” attitude, which continued in the archaeological field into the twentieth century, very evident; but they did not let that hardship stop them from accomplishing much in their domain. The inclusion of Agatha Christie’s love of archaeology helps to explain three of her crime mysteries. This well-researched collection includes a glossary, notes, bibliography, and index. The reader is left with a great admiration of these female archaeologists.

Books to read: The books about archaeology are classified as 930.1.

Reviewed by: Mary

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Tax Season

Tax season is here and with it are a few changes to tax laws. For instance, this year taxes are due by April 18th instead of the tradition 15th. For more changes in tax scheduling, visit http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=233910,00.html

Tax law changes can be read about at http://www.irs.gov/formspubs/content/0,,id=178012,00.html

And additional information for individuals can be found at http://www.irs.gov/individuals/index.html

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Moss Bluff Book Chat: January 4, 2011

Book Chat is a weekly meeting at the Moss Bluff Library that allows people to get together and discuss what they are currently reading, as well as get ideas on what to read next.

We have also begun a “Book of the Month,” which will be handed out for all members to discuss on a specific date. Our first book is The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards, which we handed out on January 4th and will discuss on February 1st. Copies are still available for those wishing to participate.

Below are a few books readers discussed at the January 4th meeting.

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Kathryn Stockett’s impressive (and popular) debut novel The Help begins in 1960s Jackson, Mississippi when Skeeter, a recent graduate of Ole Miss, decides to write about the town’s segregation. Skeeter focuses on the lives of two African-American women: Aibileen and Minny. The Help contains characters so vivid, readers have found it impossible not to become emotionally involved in their stories. Stockett also skillfully tackles issues of race. These factors, in addition to an impeccable blend of comedy and drama, make The Help a truly captivating read.

Find it at your library!

It’s Okay to Miss the Bed on the First Jump by John O’Hurley

It’s Okay to Miss the Bed on the First Jump: And Other Life Lessons I Learned from Dogs is a collection of anecdotal musings from actor John O’Hurley, who also hosts the National Dog Show. With an unchanging light-hearted tone, the book is a humorous and enjoyable read for all dog lovers.

Find it at your library!

Life as We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer

In Life as We Knew It, Miranda, 16, and her family must survive after a series of natural disasters wipe out populations around the world due to a meteor's crashing into the moon and throwing off its gravitational pull. The book presents a realistic depiction of a possible world marred with destruction -- making it an intense read at times. Life as We Knew It is the first in the Young Adult series known as “The Moon Books,” which further portray Pfeffer’s post-apocalyptic world.

Find it at your library!

(Images from: http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780399155345,00.html; http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780452288836,00.html?It's_Okay_to_Miss_the_Bed_on_the_First_Jump_John_O'Hurley#; http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/catalog/titledetail.cfm?titleNumber=1197505)

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Moss Bluff Book Chat: December 28, 2010

Book Chat is a weekly meeting at the Moss Bluff Library that allows people to get together and discuss what they are currently reading, as well as get ideas on what to read next. Below are a few books readers discussed at the December 28th meeting.

The Passage by Justin Cronin

The Passage is the first in a series of novels about a post-apocalyptic world in which people struggle to survive against vampire-like creatures, which were created by the government in a botched experiment for immortality. While the book is over 760 pages, Cronin’s writing is gripping and suspenseful enough to make his work hard to put down.

Find it at your library!

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare

City of Bones is the first book in the popular Young Adult “Mortal Instruments” series by author Cassandra Clare. The series centers around Shadowhunters, human demon-killers. With an array of supernatural creatures that includes vampires and werewolves, City of Bones is capable of satisfying those looking for an entertaining fill of fantasy.

Find it at your library!

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia

One Crazy Summer has made several short-lists for this year’s Newbery Award, and understandably so. Set in 1968, the book sees Delphine, 11, watching over her two younger sisters as they travel from Brooklyn to Oakland, California to meet their long-lost mother. The girls find themselves attending a Black Panther summer school. Williams-Garcia skillfully manages a refreshing, light-hearted take on controversial matters without discounting their importance.

Find it at your library!

(Images from http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780345516862; http://books.simonandschuster.biz/City-of-Bones/Cassandra-Clare/Mortal-Instruments-The/9781416914280; http://www.harpercollins.com/books/One-Crazy-Summer-Rita-Williams-Garcia/?isbn=9780060760885)